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Comments For Sing With the Land

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Reviewer: oshun Signed [Report This]
Date: August 03, 2013 - 05:56 am
Title: Chapter 1

I had no idea that the narrator was a woman. My assumption is based upon the prejudicial treatment within the original text itself (male unless stated otherwise). I wonder if I missed a clue? Oh, I just looked up the Veddha people online. Oh, yes. I really, really like the idea of using them as a model here. "The Veddhas are proud of their distinct sylvan heritage and call themselves Vanniyalette, 'those of the forest'." Could not be more perfect.



Author's Response:

That's because there wasn't anything obvious in the text. But I envision my character as a 'wise woman' (we know that the Edain had those, so why not the Avari? Because, keeping with Tolkien's world, the Edain must have learnt that from somewhere). Or a magician, or shaman. Whatever you call it, it's clear that most nomadic people had a special position for those who 'communed with spirits or the land'. Except, in this case, the Avari girl really can feel the 'voice' of the earth (the Music of the Ainur, as it were). 

.

.

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Why am I burdening other people with my headcanon?

Actually, 'Vanniyalette' is less accurate than 'Wanniyala-aetto', but that's just nitpicking. I wasn't aware of those lines, but what really stuck with me was a speech by the then Veddha Chief, Uru Warige, that we learnt back in elementary school. I can't find the exact words right now, because my house is a mess, but even translated into English, it was just beautiful. And I unconciously modeled my story on that, I think. (And also because of a whole lot of irony regarding the tangled history of my country)

I'm sorry. I'm ranting :).

Reviewer: Ellynn Signed [Report This]
Date: May 18, 2013 - 01:48 am
Title: Chapter 1

Lovely!  Yes, there is much wisdom in what the Avari say.



Author's Response:

Thank you :).

Reviewer: erunyauve Signed [Report This]
Date: May 17, 2013 - 10:13 pm
Title: Chapter 1

Lovely - there are certainly some lessons here for today.  Also a nice change from the fanon notion that the Sindar abandonned or slew those who escaped from Morgoth.  Sorry, no.  (Of course, the Sindar aren't Avari, but they did stay behind.)  I'm not much of an Ayn Rand fan, either.



Author's Response:

Thank you. (It was certainley a surprise to post a story and find that another story has reviews I didn't realize it had!) 

That particular fanon, I suspect, comes from the general misrepresenation of Sindar and Avari. Of course, in times of war, it would have been a necessity, but otherwise? I don't think so. I'm pretty sure that Melian could have put her power to good use and weeded out any spies.

Ayn Rand...her works are too one-sided for me. She tends to forget 'the other side' of the story. That being said, I do agree with her sometimes (especially in Atlas Shrugged. It was The Fountainhead that irked me, though even there, she has a valid point).

Reviewer: oshun Signed [Report This]
Date: May 17, 2013 - 10:05 pm
Title: Chapter 1

This story contains a lot to recommend it. The voice of the narrator and the beliefs expressed remind me of Native Americans and of Australian indigenous people. I am not sure how much the more isolated groups of the Avari actually knew much about the return of Noldor or realized its direct or indirect effect on their day-to-day life. One point that fascinates me is mentioned in the notes to the Quendi and the Eldar that the first Avari that the returning Noldor are said to have encountered are of the group who were their historical brethren, sharing common roots within the original second group, the Tatyar. I am intrigued to know more about the narrator, if he was of that grouping. I would love to read a story with plot and characterization that tells his story. Perhaps he is reacting not simply to received information but to an actual face-to-face encounter with some of those exiled Noldor.



Author's Response:

I'm still figuring out the SWG site, so bear with late replies...

Actually, I was aiming at a more biased POV :). The narrator hasn't met the Noldor--she is actually young (though not very young) and doesn't yet understand that there are two sides to the story. But she's old enough to understand the ancestral wisdom passed down to her, and to 'feel' the power of the land (Yes, you're right. I had Native Americans in mind when I was writing this, but also the natives of my country, the Veddhas). But she's also exceptionally wise for her age.

Dialogue is not my storng point, but I do have an idea simmering in my mind, when my narrator meets Celegorm...(And the sparks fly, obviously, both being who they are)

Reviewer: Erurainon Signed [Report This]
Date: May 17, 2013 - 05:35 pm
Title: Chapter 1

Yes, a fellow poet! I really enjoyed your piece and its ability to reflect a perspective little explored in the annals of Arda. I also to must praise your ability to capture art in simplisity, depth in brevity, and reason through one of the more complicated of Tolkien's literary inventions. Keep up the good work and continue writing!

Author's Response:

Thank you :)




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