TheSilmarillionWriters'Guild

Home  |  Most Recent  |  Authors  |  Titles  |  Search  |  Series  |  Podfics  |  Top Tens  |  Login  |    |  




You must login (register) to comment.

Reviewer: Keiliss Signed [Report This]
Date: April 04, 2015 - 03:55 pm
Title: Círdan the Shipwright, Part 2

I looked to see what I'd said on first reading and am annoyed at myself to discover I never left a comment. Nothing to add, Oshun, just a thank you for such a clear and comprehensive bio. I think I've read all the sources at one time or another, but seeing his life set out in chronological order like this is wodnerful. My own assessment of Cirdan as a great lord with a good instinct for politics and the art of the practical, not just a guy who did a fine job of building ships, is underlined the whole way. He always reminded me a bit of one of those independent-minded Highland chiefs who perhaps owed blood or clan loyalty elsewhere, but still ruled his own people and made his own alliances as he saw fit.  I very much enjoyed rereading this.



Author's Response:

Thanks so much, Keiliss! I really enjoyed working on his bio. He seems to pop up at every important place and event throughout his long history. And also have very important connections with everyone who counts! I like analysis very much. "Independent-minded" for sure!

Reviewer: erunyauve Signed [Report This]
Date: August 05, 2014 - 04:26 am
Title: Círdan the Shipwright, Part 2

You've done a nice job presenting an exhaustive amount of sometimes conflicting information.  Laid out like this, Círdan appears even more significant in the history of Middle-earth.

While reading this, I came to a new appreciation for his wisdom (if that is possible!).  Círdan intuitively arrives at the heart of the revolt of the Noldor - jealousy between the princes.  Though he is giving them the benefit of the doubt - and I think that's part of his nature, not to judge - he has a better grasp of people than Thingol does.  Thingol's reaction serves to excaberate those jealousies - I don't think that's his intent, but as you've presented it, the contrast between Círdan's worldliness (I'm not sure that's the right word) and Thingol's insularity with respect to people is more apparent.



Author's Response:

For some reason, I seem not to have received notification for this comment before now. I am surprised I did not notice. Thank you so much.

I am so glad that you got so much out of it. I certainly enjoyed doing the research.

I really like these points of your:

Círdan intuitively arrives at the heart of the revolt of the Noldor - jealousy between the princes.  Though he is giving them the benefit of the doubt - and I think that's part of his nature, not to judge - he has a better grasp of people than Thingol does.  Thingol's reaction serves to excaberate those jealousies - I don't think that's his intent, but as you've presented it, the contrast between Círdan's worldliness (I'm not sure that's the right word) and Thingol's insularity with respect to people is more apparent.

I think wordliness works or outwardly focused--whatever is the opposite of insular. He traveled a lot throughout his life, so his perspective was probably necessarily broader for that reason.

Reviewer: DrummerWench Signed [Report This]
Date: August 04, 2014 - 09:41 pm
Title: Círdan the Shipwright, Part 2

Oshun, this is terrific! And two parts! There's so much here--more than one thinks, at first. It turns out he is there from the beginning, through all the stories, until the end of what we know. (In the Wench-verse, he is still here...)

Thanks for writing this; it is such a great resource!

 



Author's Response:

I must have missed this comment before--thank you so very much. I am really happy that you enjoyed and appreciate it. I had a great time and learned a lot doing the research for this one.




You must login (register) to comment.